Elisa Peter

Elisa Peter

Elisa Peter - PWYP Executive Director

Dear colleagues and friends,

At PWYP, we believe that natural resource exploitation has a huge potential for good. It can generate billions of dollars to build schools and clinics, for example, rather than lining the pockets of ministers or CEOs. That’s why our determination remains unfaltering in the face of challenges - and 2017 was definitely riddled with many. It’s also why we started a process to review, assess and hone our theories of change and action, and our medium-term strategic goals and priorities, so we are best positioned to address existing and new challenges in years to come.

Early in the year, with the dust hardly settled on the US elections, the new administration rolled back a major piece of anti-corruption legislation. The result of years of advocacy by PWYP members to promote transparency in the extractive sector, the implementation rule of Section 1504 of the Dodd-Frank rule was voided. While this sent shock waves throughout the PWYP movement, it also strengthened our resolve to continue to expose the shady deals that plague the sector and the few individuals that benefit from them.

Early in the year, with the dust hardly settled on the US elections, the new administration rolled back a major piece of anti-corruption legislation. The result of years of advocacy by PWYP members to promote transparency in the extractive sector, the implementation rule of Section 1504 of the Dodd-Frank rule was voided. While this sent shock waves throughout the PWYP movement, it also strengthened our resolve to continue to expose the shady deals that plague the sector and the few individuals that benefit from them.

Notwithstanding these challenges, we strengthened the power of the global PWYP coalition throughout the year. In July, at the PWYP Africa Conference (see page 14), we adopted new strategic priorities and re-affirmed our collective commitment to hold extractive companies and governments to account for revenues generated by the exploitation of the continent’s vast mineral and oil and gas resources. From Africa to Eurasia, PWYP members came together to develop strategies to protect each other against intimidation and threats, and to devise new ways of effecting change within closing civic space. A fresh cohort of members was trained to access, analyse and use data, yielding important findings, from South Africa to Nigeria and Canada (see page 10). In many other countries, our members contributed to improvements in mining and oil legislation, participated in EITI implementation, conducted research on revenues (including taxes) generated by the extractive sector, and supported affected communities in making their voices heard. As we enter 2018, we will place greater focus on the links between social, gender and tax justice and the transparency agenda in the extractive sector. So stay tuned!

Special thanks to our coalition members, our donors, our partners and our staff who work tirelessly to increase transparency in oil, gas and mining.

In solidarity,

Elisa

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